My F2 Builds

RideCBR.com Forums Member Build Threads My F2 Builds

This topic contains 283 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of jnsracing jnsracing 2 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #28855
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    spdygak
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    Wow! Very impressive! Great pics, lots of detail. Thanks for sharing!

    #28862
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    jnsracing
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    @rhyno900 said:
    Wow bro I’m in aw of your mad skills. Im just beging in self repairs and teardowns. I did some minor mechanical to my 98 900rr, and then repainted it last winter. I thought i was doing pretty good. But you sir come of as a genius mad scientist. great job very nice F2.

    @spdygak said:
    Wow! Very impressive! Great pics, lots of detail. Thanks for sharing!

    Thanks to both of you guys… @rhyno900, I don’t think I’m really deserving of that kind of praise, but thanks, nonetheless… bottom line is, if I can do it, so can anybody – what helps me, is having a very good memory, and just never attacking any job, with “I can’t make this work” or “I don’t think I can make this work”, but rather “HOW WILL I make this work?”

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    #28891
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    rhyno900
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    @JNSRacing said:
    Thanks to both of you guys… @rhyno900, I don’t think I’m really deserving of that kind of praise, but thanks, nonetheless… bottom line is, if I can do it, so can anybody – what helps me, is having a very good memory, and just never attacking any job, with “I can’t make this work” or “I don’t think I can make this work”, but rather “HOW WILL I make this work?”

    Thanks for thoses kind words as well, I have in the last few years began a similar phiosopy about bikes. i don’t know alot but i am learning as i go. to take the bikes i love to a shop was killing me financially. So i decieded to take on the challenges myself like I did with my cars. so know i push and push to figure out what problems are and learn for the next time.

    #28943
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    jnsracing
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    I picked up a black F3 rear rim, from a member of another CBR forum site, for $80 shipped. The rim was in excellent condition, both in that the finish was really good, and it was perfectly straight.
    Since this is a 5 inch rim, as opposed to the stock 4.5 inch, I upgraded my Q2 in the rear to a 170/60.

    Right about that time, I scored a trailer, which was a very well done conversion employing a boat trailer frame, and using all CCA lumber… the lights worked fine as well, and the tires were in good shape, though they weren’t rated for high-speed use, making this a killer deal, at $250.

    I mounted a wheel chock, and some heavy duty D-rings, for securing items with straps and security cables, and picked up a 6 ft. X 3 ft. (I think) folding aluminum ramp, which I happened to catch on sale at Harbor Freight, for just about $100, instead of the usual $169.

    I replaced the 3-ply tires with 6-ply, high-speed rated tires, which got me brand new wheels as well – I lucked out on the timing of this purchase, as these were on sale for about $45 each from Orschelin supply.

    I also installed a speed-jack on the trailer’s tongue, as well as a spare tire rig, so I could use one of the old wheels for a spare.

    Then I installed a Pit Bull trailer restraint system – once you own one of these, you will never have a trailer setup without it! Loading and unloading is incredibly simplified – between this at the rear, and the chock up front, I can load/unload with no assistance at all, which, I could do without the Pit Bull unit, but now it’s just so much easier.

    I was unable to have the bike with a GP shift setup, once I got the new fairings on, because the clearance around the linkage was tighter than with the OEM plastics, so I finally got around to making a “cut-out” in this area, cleaning up the edges, and going over the cut edge with the Honda gloss black touch up paint, which matches the black of the aftermarket fairings just fine.

    I met an awesome bro from Cali, on one of the other CBR forums, that used to do track days with an F2, and bought an assortment of much needed items, for an incredible price – this included a Two Brothers header, some old Cheetah bodywork, that needed some TLC, some spare drive train parts (46 tooth Vortex sprocket, sprocket carrier, cush drive, and several wheel spacers), and most importantly, a Fox Twin Clicker shock, already sprung for the weight I needed it to be for.

    Header installed:

    Fox shock installed:

    After installing the header, and cleaning/oiling the air filter, I gave it a flogging on a highway almost entirely devoid of traffic, made some fueling adjustments (I don’t remember exaclty what I did at that point), and took it out for another shakedown run… in addition to losing another 3 lb. 2.4 oz, the header gave me an obvious additional boost to both the top-end and mid-range, and I again had to compensate my riding to keep the front wheel on the ground… it sounded very sweet as well!!

    As for the shock setup, I went with Fox’s recommended baseline’s, for all adjustments, as a starting point, and have gotten very lucky, in that I have not had to alter those settings yet – later, when I was first on the race track with these new components – the suspension was as close to perfect as I could have wanted, it was like riding on rails.
    Before that particular track day, I also installed a quick turn throttle, which took the range of throttle closed, to wide open, from 1/2 turn, to 1/6 turn.

    I ran Michelin’s Power Cup V profile front, with the Power One rear, both in medium compounds. These are DOT race tires – not just the “street versions” – but treaded race tires.
    It was 95º by 9:30am that day and 105º for the remainder of the sessions, which is why I went with the medium compound for both front and rear, and it was a good choice, as I stuck like glue to the track all day long, and got several other days out of them, in the very similar conditions.

    Also, at this point, I removed the mirrors, installing block-off plates, bypassed the sidestand safety switch, after shortening it’s harness back over a foot in length, and removed the switch from the sidestand assembly, for removal at the track, and in addition to removing all the un-needed bits at the rear (bulbs & harnesses, license plate, signal stalks, etc.), I trimmed an additional bit of metal from the Fender Eliminator kit – cutting this metal only shaved 45 grams, but weight loss adds up!

    At this stage, with all the new components installed, plus a few small reductions, which came from grinding down the kickstand mounting bolts (needed to be done to clear the shift rod, when reverting back to GP shift), further trimming of the front fender, for better clearance of the taller race tire, and the little bit of trimmed fairing needed for clearance with the GP shift setup, my total weight reduction was 27 lb. 9.4 oz… this takes in account the increased weight from the heavier race shock.

    Some pics during, and immediately after that track day, before fully converting back to street legal:

    I can’t praise those tires enough, and with HPT being a very “balanced” track, with regards to left/right turns, the tires still looked fantastic, with even wear, and plenty of life left.

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    #29023
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    jnsracing
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    I mentioned the old, but new-to-me Cheetah race glass, which had me kind of excited about learning some new stuff, with reparing the battle wounds, and re-painting them.
    Here’s some pics of how they came to me.

    I cleaned the pieces up, removed the pin-striping, and mocked-up the parts, to start trying to get ideas for painting.

    Now I have to give a “disclaimer” before I begin to show the work I did to these fairings: I have zero paint experience… nada!! Unless you count painting models, and spray painting Hot Wheels cars as a little kid, and I had not done any kind of body work since my junior year of highschool, in Auto Mechanics class, where my best friend, a foreign exchange student from Germany, and I, spent a lot of extra time helping our instructor restore a ’67 Chevy long-bed pickup. Most of what I did back then, was engine work, and general mechanical work – I rebuilt a lot of engines, a straight-six, a small block Ford (302), several small block Chevy’s, and the big block 454, that went in the aforementioned truck, but after all the Bondo application and sanding, to that truck, I did no other body and/or paint work.

    So… not a body and paint guy, and I could not afford to invest in proper painting equimpment, let alone the cost of the paint!!! My hair curled when a auto finish guy told me that it can cost around $100 for a red, in the same quantity as what would cost around $30 for gloss black!!
    This was to be a good ol’ spray-bomb job! I intended to learn as much as I could, picking the brains of some people, and do as good of a job on prep as I could, but let’s face it, this is race plastic – crashes are going to happen. And to be dead-honest, the only reason I would like to upgrade to a “proper” setup in the future, would be that I could then use higher quality paints, and get them shot faster, though, with all the equipment setup, and cleaning of the stuff, I’m not sure how much faster it would be for such a small surface area anyway.

    This stuff was really worn, and there was only so much I could do to get all of the surface smooth, as it had obviously been sanded and painted quite a few times before, and there were a lot of places where the texture of the fiberglass was starting to show through. I re-inforced these “thinner” spots from the inside, even if there were no cracks or breaks in these areas. All said and done, with all the paint applied, following all the prep and repair, the kit is much stronger and “stiffer” than it was before.
    This is how it looked with all the fiberglass repair done, the exterior sanded, and after attending to the imperfections there, with spot and glazing putty.

    I don’t know if the bike they were last mounted on had a bent faring stay, or what, but not much lined up properly, so after this mock-up, I had to fill a lot of the mounting holes and start over – in the process, I trimmed some of the fiberglass around the sides of the windscreen, where it continued for like 6 inches or more past the fairing stay mounts – you can see the difference if you compare the early pics of the upper, with that last pic.

    Re-drilled the mounting holes, then prime, sand, repeat.

    Gloss black base-coat… three total coats, I think.

    I took one of my early “designs”, if you will, of my aluminum race exhaust hanger, and rigged it to work for mounting the rear of the racing tail section…. a lenght of “all thread”, nuts, washers, coupling nut, and screw… I love my local ACE hardware store!

    This allowed me to remove the base pan for the fender eliminator kit, which, along with the race bodywork, cut my track-day setup by a further 8lb. 9oz.

    I didn’t have time to get any color on it for my first track day with this bike, so this is how it looked on the way to the track.

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    #29075
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    jnsracing
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    After that first event, I taped off the fairings, and shot some red accents on the tail and lowers.

    I mounted them on the bike, using the black tank cover that came with the Hong Kong street fairing kit, so I could see how things looked with a black tank.

    I taped off the tail, for painting on the number plates…

    …and shot the yellow.

    I also taped off the upper, for the number plate, and got it painted, choosing a different layout than the typical, centered, “ginormous” plate up front.

    I decided to lighten things just a touch more, by shortening the RS-3 oval can by about 5.25 inches, and I bought a cheap seat, that had a little damage on the passenger part, so I could chop it, and re-staple the cover, giving me a make-shift, lighter, solo seat… these two items cut another 2 1/4 lb. of weight.

    I had already decided that the upper was looking bare, and wanted to get some red on it as well, so I finally got around to doing that, a little later.

    Applied all the numbers/sponsor graphics, and shot all the pieces with several clear coats.

    Here’s how they look on the bike:

    I re-visited one of my previous “backdrops”, to try to get some “nice” photos of the work so far.

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    #29088
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    jnsracing
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    I installed a few new items in these next two pics: Vortex clip-ons, CRG adjustable billet race levers, and Renthal’s new kevlar superbike grips. Since the OEM rectangular master cylinder mounts with the reservoir so close to the clip-ons, it posed a problem with the design of the Vortex clip-ons, so I bought an extra handlebar clamp piece, and flipped it in reverse, using longer bolts, to offset the master cylinder about a 1/2 inch from the standard mounting. The adjustable levers allowed me to bring the brake lever back to a comfortable spot – this workaround was only temporary, and was addressed very soon thereafter.

    I resolved the above issue by mounting a 900RR master cylinder – the design of this master cylinder puts the reservoir up-and-over the clip-on, taking care of the clearance issue – it also looks better, and saved a touch more weight.

    I made some improvements to the safety-wired components, employing some spring clips in places where parts are frequently removed/replaced.

    I installed a lightweight billet Vortex keyless gas cap, for quicker fills at the track, and an improvement in asthetics – it also shaved another 1/2 pound over the OEM unit.

    Got some speed-bleeders installed on the front calipers, and upgraded to a race-approved pulse generator cover.

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    #29221
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    jnsracing
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    The reason this thread is titled “My F2 Builds “, plural, is because at about this time, I needed to find another F2, even one in “not so great” cosmetic shape, with regards to the plastic, seat, windscreen, and mirrors, so I could put my current street stuff on the new bike, and would then have a dedicated street bike, and dedicated race bike… I was getting really weary of spending a couple of hours before and after each event, taking the bike from street legal to race-trim, and vice versa.

    At last I found a bike in decent condition, with about 30K, that I could score for very cheap, as the previous owner had wrecked it, damaging the forks, plastics, and the subframe. The good thing was, that I had planned to pick up some forks from a ’94 model anyway, so that I would have more adjustability at the race track, and I could just install the current forks on the new bike – the triples on the new bike were not damaged, just the stanchions. It had the same Vortex clip-ons, that I had on the first bike, albeit in black, and though the left bar was bent, this was only a $15 replacement.

    This is how it looked before I got it.

    Some “pluses” with the new bike, were that the engine and gearbox were in good shape, the rims were straight, the tank was completely free of corrosion, it had new tires front and rear, had a clean title in my state, and included some of the parts that needed to be replaced.
    The bike had been sitting for 4 months, without being started, but it had run OK before that, so I started with the carbs.
    I cleaned the carbs, and in the process, found that it had a UNI “hi-flow” filter, so since it already had an older Yoshimura R&D slip-on (much like the early round RS-3), I went ahead and graduated it to 138 main jets, shimmed up the needle jets, and started the pilot screws 1/4 turn further out than the OEM starting place. The carbs weren’t really all that bad, but they were a little bit “gunked”, so I knew there would be some improvement – also, the pilot screws initially were all over the place in their settings, and I found that at carb 2, the clamp which holds the boot on to the carb, was missing it’s screw and nut, so there surely would have been a vacuum leak there.
    After finishing with the carbs, installing new plugs, and re-charging the almost brand new battery, it fired up immediately, with no need of choke.
    I knew I would surely have to fine tune the fueling later, after riding it some, but it started and idled really well, even in the cold.

    In this picture you can see the bent left clip-on, as well as the fact that the bar is adjusted too far “out”, and that there is no end-cap at the top of the clip-on – it was the same on the other side.

    Since I had to replace the left bar anyway, I took the other end-cap from the left bar, put it on the right one, and got the right clip-on adjusted to where it ought to be.

    At that time, I also replaced the throttle housing/switch assembly, as the kill switch was cracked, and I had an extra that was in good shape. While I was at it, I fabricated a “quick-turn” throttle from the existing tube, so going from closed to full throttle would be easier on the wrists.

    When the forks came in, I got them cleaned up, for installation on the race bike – they were in very good shape, and I got them for $175 + $17 shipping. I will be later installing Race Tech springs in these as well, and of course, putting in new oil, seals, and dust wipers.

    Somewhere around this time, I got the bent subframe on the new bike straightened, then installed the new forks on the race bike, and swapped over the old Race Tech-sprung forks to the new bike.

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    #29225
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    jnsracing
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    Installed the replacement bar in the left clip-on, and positioned things correctly – also installed my new favorite grips, Renthal’s Kevlar superbike grips.

    One of the previous owners had installed a new stator cover, but there was a very, very, slight oil leak at the bottom of the cover. I don’t know if the person who installed this failed to clean off the old gasket material, failed to install the new gasket correctly, or failed to torque the bolts correctly, but I decided to start simple, by loosening all the bolts, and torquing them to spec – it seems to be resolved now.

    I got the fuel tank mounted, swapped the battery cover over from the other bike, as this one was missing it, and mounted the fender eliminator items, along with the tail light assemby – all the lights and signals on the new bike check out, except for the tag light, which I think just needs a new bulb.

    I mounted the frame sliders, and begin to install the bodywork, where I learned that the upper portion of the fairing stay was indeed straight and true, but the smaller brackets below, containing the grommets for holding the plastic pins on the headlight assembly, were somewhat askew. Re-positioning these is very simple, but it took some trial and error to get things right. I will probably work on tweaking these brackets just a smidge, the next time I have occasion to take the fairings off, since all the upper and lower front fairings mounted fine, but they are just a little, tiny bit off – nothing that you would see, if you weren’t removing/installing them.

    The passenger peg bracket/exhaust hanger units that came on the bike, are from a ’99-’00 R1 (I think), which puts the pegs up higher than they should be, and would cramp a passenger, and it also requires the exhaust to mount a little higher than it should, which doesn’t look right. I was forced to use these for now, as someone in the past literally bent the mid-pipe, so that the muffler would mount on these brackets! :-x
    It would work for a bit… I planned to get the muffler cut down, to remove the portion that was damaged in the PO’s crash, lighten things up a little, and of course, make it sound even meaner! (This can really does sound great, as it is right now). While at it, I planned to heat the mid-pipe, and attempt to bend it back to where it should be, so that I could mount the black OEM brackets, that I previously modified, and mounted those billet pegs to.

    This is how it sat, at that point.

    As you can see, the exhaust is not sitting at the proper angle, it should be parallel to the horizontal axis of the tail section.
    The red rims don’t look too bad, but the Ronald McDonald fender has got to go! I’ll be painting it black as soon as the weather permits. Though the rims aren’t atrocious, I would rather black, as that shade of red is a little “dated”, and, well, I would just rather they were black!
    I have two black rear rims, my original F2 rim, and the wider F3 rim, but I’ve only got one black front rim – my plan is to pick up another black front rim, and then I’ll just mount rain tires on the red rims, for use in wet races.
    I rode the bike to and from work a couple of times, and confirmed that I was right about the fueling – I need to up my main jets, and then adjust the lower fueling circuits, though I decided not to work on this until I adressed the muffler issue.

    After a major battle, due to heat cycles and corrosion, I finally got the muffler and mid-pipe off the bike, and also decided to pull the swingarm, so I could weld on some couplers for lift spools, like I did on the other one… while at it, I did some good cleaning, scrubbing down the rear components, swingarm, and engine/gearbox areas that were now more accessible with the swinger off.

    Since the swing arm from the new bike looked a little better than the other one, I chose to hang up the tail end of both bikes, put this swingarm on the race bike, and give the other swingarm and rear components a good thorough cleaning, while I was at it.

    I mounted the “nicer” swingarm to the race bike, with my temporary, “makeshift” lift spools… I’ve got an order I need to make from Sportbiketrackgear.com, in the near future, so I’ll get another set of Pit Bull spools from them, at the same time.

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    #29799
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    jnsracing
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    I ordered some “knock-offs” of the CRG levers that I have installed on the race bike, for putting on the street bike, so I could maintain as much similarity as possible of the riding “feel” between the two bikes, and, so I could adjust the brake lever to account for the additional spacer at the master cylinder mounting.
    I got these from a U.S. seller, for $30.96, with free shipping – my CRG race levers of the same construct were somewhere between $150 and $200, for comparison.

    Next it was time to work on the Yoshimura R&D muffler – my goal was to shorten the can, in order to get rid of some of the damage to it, re-pack it, and work on the finish, which was pretty bad at this point.

    This is the dent I needed to try to eliminate.

    I began to disassemble the muffler, to see how this one is constructed – 5 or 6 of the allen head screws securing the sleeve to the baffle assembly had the hex portion stripped out, so I had to slot them with my Dremel, and use a large flathead screwdriver in conjunction with a combination wrench, to get those out.

    After drilling the rivets out, which held the inlet flange to the baffle assembly, I made an initial shortening cut, back to about where the dent was, so I could further examine the construction, and I also wanted to straighten the dent, so that when I made the final cut right near it, to remove the “creased” portion, the cut would be straight.

    To knock out the dent, I positioned the rounded handle of a breaker bar, right at the dent’s location on the inside of the sleeve, and elevated the other end, by setting it on a drift, so I could strike the breaker bar with a mallet, close to the end of the sleeve, which would focus the force of the blow on the dent.

    I used this method repeatedly, stopping to re-examine the dent every so often, and repostion this rig of mine, until the dent was barely detectable, except for the crease in the finish.

    I picked the spot where I want the final cut to be, and using some precision measurements from the non-cut, square end of the shell, I made a series of light etchings in the surface, and then took a large, straight hose clamp, tightened it where its edge was right at my marks, all the way around, and made a deeper etch around the circumference, using the hose clamp as a guide to slide against.

    I carefully made some short strokes along the etching, with the hack-saw, to make a slightly deeper and wider groove for my saw to follow, for the final cut.

    I got it hacked off, and used a small drum sander on the Dremel to clean up the edge.

    Next I had to do some mock-ups, and measurements, to determine where to cut the baffle, for shortening the internal bits.
    With all the parts disassembled and cut appropriately, I was ready to re-weld the baffle bits.

    The weld looks sloppy in this pic, but in my defense, I had not yet cleaned up the slag and dust! :mrgreen:

    Time for polishing… this is how the sleeve looked after the first runs with the fastcut compound.

    And, after some treatment with the softer buff, and the finishing compound.

    I polished the end caps as well, and did a mock-up, to see how it would look assembled – it’s not fantastic but the original condition has to be considered.

    I got it repacked and reassembled – it’s about 1 1/2 lb. lighter, and just about precisely 6 inches shorter.
    I picked up some black screws, and some stainless screws, and decided on the black – I might change it later.

    Here it is re-mounted, after straightening the mid-pipe, that one of the previous owners bent, in order to connect to the shorter R1 peg brackets that were on the bike when I got it.

    With the amount that I shortened the exhaust, I knew there was a possibility that the mounting “strap” of the muffler, might end up right at the edge of the nameplate, or worse, overlap it – I knew this was going to be likely, so when a mock fitting showed that the strap would indeed go over the nameplate, I had two options:

    (1) I could order a shorter, more square-shaped nameplate, drill new holes and rivet it on, so that that the new plate will re-use the rear-most rivet hole, and after filling in the existing rivet holes at the front, I could cover that blemish with the mounting strap, or…

    (2) I could craft a mounting “relocation” bracket, so that the mounting strap is in the “ideal” location, and to that, I bolt the new bracket, and then bolt the other end to the exhaust hanger.

    In the future, I might order a different nameplate, and rivet it on, so I can mount the muffler “normally”, but in the meantime, I found a very thin, flexible piece of scrap steel, laying around the garage, and fabricated a bracket with which to secure the exhaust.

    The new Zero Gravity double-bubble windscreen, for the race bike, arrived, but I will not be mounting it until I’m ready to put the race plastics back on, and there’s much to do before that time.

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    #29804
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    jnsracing
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    So now it’s time to focus on the race bike – still lots to do there.

    My plan (future) is to install a Graves fairing stay and Koso guages, but that will probably not happen until next season… I just don’t have the money for that this year.
    So, modifying my current cluster setup, to eliminate what’s not needed, and lighten things up, is the compromise.

    I started with eliminating the black plastic “shroud”, or bezel, that goes topmost on the guage set, and since the OEM setup, is 6 screws going from the back, through the cluster base and the clear lens, and then tightening into the aforementioned black piece, I needed to secure the lens to the guages a different way.
    I just used some small screws, M4 I believe, some small washers, and nylon insert nuts or wingnuts, depending on the area where the screw would tighten into the nuts.

    In this picture of the back, I circled the places where the nut/wingnut sits, in yellow, I circled the examples of bulb/wiring bits that were completely removed, in green, and the red circle is around the rubber bulb connector that I decided to leave in, albeit without a bulb, since I didn’t want water to be able to splash in that hole, and fog the tachometer.

    At this time, I’m not concerned about having a backlight for any of the guages, but in case I change my mind, I only removed the bulbs from those connectors, but in the case of the side stand, high beam, and both turn signal indicators, I removed everything, stripping the wires out of the harness, including the pins in the plugs, and re-built the harness.

    I also stripped the wires for the headlight, horn, front signals, re-taped the front harness, and removed the signal flasher, as well as doing the same thing at the rear, with the signals and tail/stop lights.

    I had already put the extended frame sliders on the street bike, as I ordered some shorter ones for the race bike, reason being, the longer they are, the more likley they are to simply snap off in the event of a crash, especially if they catch a seam or crack in the track’s surface, while sliding along.
    I installed these, and began to lighten the frame up just a touch, by cutting the center stand mounts, the left side passenger peg bracket mounting tabs, and any unnecessary fairing mount bits, that are only used by street plastic.
    Circled in this picture, are examples of some of these items, and of course, I removed them from the other side, as well, with the exception of the tabs that the exhaust hanger still needs to bolt to.

    Since the very rear of the subframe now only needs to hold my tail-mount bracket, I trimmed some steel back there, and ground the burrs off.

    I drilled some holes in the rear of the batter compartment, in the area where the OEM tools used to be stored, and used zip ties through those holes, to re-locate the ICM, routing the harness around through the opening on the left side…

    …which allowed me to also trim off the bracket that used to hold the ICM, as well as ditch the rubber sleeve, which gripped the ICM, and had slots for mounting on the now deleted brackets.

    Some folks think removing some of these items is pointless, but just between the lightening of the intrument cluster setup, removing the front sprocket cover, trimming unnecessary frame items, and removing unnecessary wires/plugs/bulbs/etc., I’ve shaved an additional 3 lb.

    I polished the lightweight exhaust hanger I made – looks far better now!

    I further trimmed down the aluminum bracket I made for mounting the upper rear portion of the race tail, and polished the piece, just because I had the stuff to do it!

    I drilled the cluster, and installed and wired up a race ignition switch.

    It works great, and further cut weight by just over 1/2 pound.

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #29806
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    jnsracing
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    I put the race bike’s battery cover on the street bike, as it didn’t have one, so I ordered a replacment, and got it installed.

    I worked over the top triple clamp, trimming unnecessary metal for mounting the ignition switch, and polishing it.

    While I was at it, I etched some marks at 2mm intervals, for keeping record of the clip-on orientation in case I toy with alternate settings for the bar angle.
    My “panic button” needs to be replaced – got some brake fluid on it at some point, and ruined the finish.

    So this brings my builds to current time… now I can start checking out other member’s builds!

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #29859
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    jnsracing
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    Very small, nearly insignificant update…

    The make-shift lift spools served me well, but I received the Pit Bull spools yesterday, and got those mounted.

    The new bike didn’t have any tire valve caps, so I took the steel ones from the race bike, and replaced them with some red anodized aluminum caps.

    Race Tech springs for the new forks on the race bike are shipping today, so I will get those installed beginning Friday evening.

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #30187
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    jnsracing
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    I got the red fuel tank stripped today – I’ve got some red Honda wing decals on the way, that should be here any day, and as soon is it warms up a bit, I’ll finish the prep on the tank, shoot on gloss black, apply the decals, and clear coat it.

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #30194
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    spdygak
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    Wow! Still amazed at the detail work you’ve done!

    #30368
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    jnsracing
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    @spdygak said:
    Wow! Still amazed at the detail work you’ve done!

    Thanks @spdygak, I appreciate it! At this stage of the game, with the race bike, it’s the sum total of all those “little” details, that will give me an edge, and I need every edge I can get, as my racing org doesn’t have a middleweight class – if you’re not under 550cc, you’re in the regular GT class, which is basically GT Unlimited rules, meaning, I’m competing against any year of litre-bike with a 20 year old 600!

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #30459
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    spdygak
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    Daamn, that’s a wide open group. I don’t know anything about the racing side. We went to New Orleans new track and watched the AMA races last year. It was awesome! Local guy from Gulfport Josh Hayes won his class.

    #30485
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    bobby
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    Looking good. Your are doing some great work. Keep it up.

    #30501
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    jnsracing
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    @Bobby said:
    Looking good. Your are doing some great work. Keep it up.

    Thanks @Bobby… more to come soon – new Race Tech springs are at the house, and new seals and dust wipers should be there tonight, so I can get the newer forks prepped for the race bike.
    Also, this weekend I’ll be getting the larger main jets in the street bike, to cure my fueling issues there.

    I’m hoping for a warm weekend – it had gotten real cold again, and we got hit with a few more inches of snow this past weekend. :-x

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #30810
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    This weekend afforded me a couple of very nice days (74º Sat./65º Sun.) with low humidity, so I cleaned the tank with grease/wax remover, hit it with tack-cloth, and shot the gloss black – it went on very nicely.

    I shot 3 or 4 coats total, then the next day, lightly wet sanded with 1000 grit, and applied the Honda wing decals.

    I haven’t finished it up with the clear, so bear in mind that this is NOT the finished product!

    On the street bike, I installed the larger main jets, and turned out the pilot screws an additional 1/2 turn… spot-ON! This eliminated the popping on decel, and it runs like a scalded dog now, hitting redline very quickly, and giving me my favorite problem while riding a sportbike: keeping the front wheel on the ground! :mrgreen:

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #31087
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    I got the forks finished – new Race Tech springs, seals, wipers, and fork oil – and got them remounted on the bike, and everything torqued to spec.

    New “Panic” button put in it’s place. :mrgreen:

    I got the tank for the race bike finished yesterday evening, with about 5 coats of clear – tonight, or this weekend, I will get it mounted, and swap the Vortex race cap to it, putting the matching keyed cap on the street bike.

    In this pic, you can kind of see that the finish has a slightly “milky” look to it, and this usually goes away in about a day, but as a matter of fact, it had already turned to a beautiful gloss black finish, by the time I put the tank inside at the end of the night.

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #31094
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    jnsracing
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    Also happening this weekend, will be the deletion of the rear master cylinder reservoir, on the race bike.
    I now have the Tygon 2375 tubing, and the cap, so it’s just a matter of cutting to length, positioning, and wiring in place.

    This will likely save maybe 1/4 pound, if even that, but as some of you know, racing is about chasing grams sometimes! Slaughter 454 individual grams, and you’ve killed yourself a pound! :mrgreen:

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #31261
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    I got some things done this weekend – it actually seemed like quite a productive time.
    I attended to an issue with the throttle tube on the street bike – the Vortex clip-on bars are just a little bit smaller in OD, than the OEM clip-ons, just small enough that the throttle housing/switch gear, and the turn signal/choke/highbeam switch gear, can rotate around and/or slide toward the end of the bar, even with the screws fully tightend.
    The OEM right clip-on has a little hole, that holds on to a pin, which is pressed into the lower part of the throttle housing, so that it is locked in position when mounted, but even without that pin in place, when you clamp the assembly shut, and tighten the screws, it doesn’t move around – at least mine did not.

    I was able to pull that little pin out of an extra throttle housing/switch assembly I had, press it into the one on the street bike, and drill the appropriate hole in the Vortex clip-on bar, so that it’s “locked” – this is going to make riding it much easier, especially since the bike accelerates so much harder, after getting the fueling issues resolved!

    Next was the deletion of the rear master cylinder reservoir on the race bike. I got the tubing cut, clamped it in place, installed the cap and clamped it, then drilled a little hole in some of the plastic off the bottom of the battery box, so I could zip tie it in place.

    The parts used for the original setup total 83 grams, and the replacement tube, cap, and zip tie are 14 grams. Also, whereas the total fluid weight for the original setup was 35 grams, the fluid contained in the Tygon tube is only 8 grams, which makes this setup lighter by just under 1/4 pound… like I said in a previous post, it’s not much, but it adds up.

    I pulled the street bike’s red fender, and got it cleaned painted, and clear coated. In this picture, once again, like the fuel tank, you can see a “milky” appearance, making it look greyish in color. I was getting nervous as the fender had MUCH more of this look, than the tank did, even as I was done for the night last night. The labeling on the can says that this can happen, and that it will clear up in about 24 hours, and the tank did, though it might have been a touch more than 24 hours. On the fender though, it was so much more extreme, that I was worried I was going to have to redo it, since even at 6:30am, it didn’t look like it had changed one bit, but, I was happy to see that during my lunch hour, when I checked it again, it had obviously dissipated quite a bit… I’ll get a pic again once it’s remounted.

    I decided to pull the front wheel while I had the fender off, and give it a proper toothbrush detail cleaning, as there has been some grease and grime in some of the little knooks, like the hollow side of each spoke – it looked alright from about ten feet away, but now it looks great up close.

    With the forks back on, the newly painted tank installed, and the front wheel and seat back on, the race bike is starting to look like a motorcycle again… a little bit.

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #31263
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    admin
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    I love reading your write ups and how detailed you are.. it’s like reading a story. Can’t wait to see the end product. Awesome work, as usual.

    #31334
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    jnsracing
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    @admin said:
    I love reading your write ups and how detailed you are.. it’s like reading a story. Can’t wait to see the end product. Awesome work, as usual.

    Thanks, I appreciate that! I’m anxious as well, to get all this crap done, and get that baby back on the track, where it belongs!

    (((http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/my-f2-builds/))) (((https://www.facebook.com/JNSRacing72)))

    #31781
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    I was going to wait to put the plastics back on, until I had replaced my sprockets, installed steering damper, changed the oil, mounted the slicks, etc., but I’ve simply gotten tired of looking at the plastics sitting on the dining room floor, and tired of looking at the bike in it’s more “undone” state, so I went ahead and re-fit things for now, so I could see how the new windscreen looks.

    I’m going to be very happy with the double-bubble screen on the track, compared to the stock screen’s profile.

    Here’s how it looks with the newly painted tank, with everything temporarily back together.

    As you can see, the fender wasn’t remounted… because it can’t be! The front mounting bosses for the fender are not in the same place as they are for my ’92 and ’93 fork sliders, and I’m not sure why, as these forks came off of a ’94 F2, allegedly
    Well, it’s because these are not F2 forks, they are from an F3, whether ’95-’96, or ’97-’98, I don’t know, but regardless, this begs the question: WHY was I able to mount my F2 axle, wheel, spacers, and brakes, without any issue?!? :-| :?:

    If I remember correctly, I learned that the F2 fork lowers are not compatible with wheel/brakes from an F3, and vice versa… if this is the case, then why did it mount with no play, with the calipers lining up perfectly on the discs, and oriented so that the pads bite the discs in the same surface area as with the old forks?!? With the front components properly torqued on each bike, the clearances all appear to be the same.
    I’m going to put both bikes up on the front stands tonight, remove the wheels, and gets some measurements, to be sure, but from what I can tell at this point, if I order an F3 fender, I’m done… we’ll see.

    Also regarding the race bike, since it has been sitting for a while, it would run just a little bit rough, on occasions when I would start it up. After I put the newly painted tank back on, I put 2 gallons of fuel in, with a moderately rich concentration of Sea Foam, and ran if for a bit until the Sea Foam-infused fuel was cycled into the bowls, and it began to run a little rougher yet. Then I completely filled the tank, and ran it for a while again, so the Sea Foam concentration was broken down somewhat, and I could hear the obvious sound of it running nicely – it’s screaming once again! I can’t wait to get back on the track!

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    #32870
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    cbr-f2
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    Any news on the fender issue?

    #32871
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    cbr-f2
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    Btw I’m diggin that dbl bubble… I think I wanna get one now… Thanks, My wife’s gonna hurt me when i do. Lol 8-O

    #32885
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    @CBR-F2 said:
    Any news on the fender issue?

    Well, I never got a chance to try the to wet sand it again with a very fine grit, and try to buff it, as a lot of the new paint is now scraped off on the left side… you’ll understand after my next post. :(

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    #32886
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    Good news/bad news posts…

    First, the bad: somebody pulled a bonehead move on the highway a couple of weeks ago, and made a VERY abrupt, improper lane change into my lane, while I was headed home for work. The driver did not signal, clearly didn’t check his mirrors and blindspot, and when he entered my lane (middle of the three) there was only about 20 feet between us, his lane was moving about 15 MPH slower than my lane where I was going about 70 MPH – this is all bone-headed enough already, but to really show his inablility to safely operate a vehicle at highway speeds, or any speed, for that matter, he instantly realized what he had done, but in his panic at this, rather than jerk back over into the lane he came from, he slammed on the BRAKES!!!

    He hit the brakes so hard, that his mini-van “dove” on braking, any harder and he would have no doubt locked them up.

    This all happened in a matter of miliseconds, and my thought was simply: “this is my last thought”.

    Thankfully, I was already signalling to move over yet another lane to the right, to prepare for getting off the highway soon, and as a result of that, when I struck his van, my front wheel just missed making contact, and so the impact was with the left front of my bike, on the right rear of his van.

    I really thought it was all over for me, but after impact, I realized that I was still alive, and furthermore, that I had managed to stay on, and keep the thing on two wheels – I immediately made a note of his plate number, in the event he did not pull over.

    He did stop… an ambulance came, the Highway Patrol came, and our statements were taken. I was worried about how this was going to end up, as nobody stopped, nobody that saw it came to bear witness, oh no, getting home to eat dinner and watch TV was just too important for anyone to even just say “Hey, I do have to run, but I saw it, and here’s my name and phone number.”

    The brunt of the impact was absorbed by the front fairings, the fairing stay, and the radiator – the entire fairing set is trashed, due to tabs breaking all over the place, even on panels not near the impact.

    Those fragments in the above pic, are all that’s left of the left upper, and the left lower is also mostly gone, along with the inspection door – most of this stuff was reduced to plastic shards on the highway.

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