new member from uk

RideCBR.com Forums New Member Introductions new member from uk

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  • #62370
    Profile photo of robdixon
    robdixon
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Newbie
    Points: 665

    Hi I’m Rob from newcastle in the UK, I have a 97 cbr600f in lovely condition and was wondering if anyone had any ideas on front head lift stands?, I bought one because I wanted to change the fork seals but when I tried to use it the ducting for the direct air intake is covering the lower stem! Has anyone else had this problem and got any ideas? Cheers guys great forum

    #62374
    Profile photo of fishfryer
    fishfryer
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 13,417

    I think you have a local expert. @jules will know. She knows everything. It’s freaky.

    Welcome to the site.

    #62375
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    roqet
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Addict
    Points: 8,449

    Welcome!

    #62382
    Profile photo of conrice
    conrice
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Newbie
    Points: 654

    Welcome to RideCBR!

    #62383
    Profile photo of damitch
    damitch
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Regular
    Points: 1,019

    Hi Rob and welcome!
    smilerider.bmp

    Now the proud owner of a 97 CBR 600 F3 :) :) :)

    #62384
    Profile photo of theredrocket
    theredrocket
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 33,444

    @robdixon First and foremost welcome! And post some pics for our viewing pleasures. When I used to do front end work to my F3, I used a climbing rope tied into a 2part sling and hung it from a beam in my carport. I tied it off to the frame and used this method for removing my rear tire also. Poor mans stand :wink:

    #62391
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    Hello Rob and welcome to the forum :)

    That duct you mention is the main fresh air duct to the carburetors via the big black airbox under the tank. It is part of the ram air system and also in the nose fairing there are two much smaller inlets that are bolted to either side.

    The ducting has that grill on to keep bugs and debris from flying in during riding and blocking any of the airways and ducts. So, since you say you have already cut it then I will advise you definitely get the grill back in place somehow.

    If it was me I definitely would not have cut it, I find cutting pieces out of things, especially bodywork, to get at other things is the bodger’s way but I am a bit of a purist, I would have simply removed the airbox from the top and then released the lower ducting out of the way or found some other way to do the forks. The front of that ducting is shaped and cut at an angle and protruded a certain distanced that presumably was worked out by Honda engineers for good flow into the airbox. They do tend to design things and do things a certain way for a reason and it’s why I won’t mess around with their designs.

    I’m sure it will be fine though and not too critical, just put the grill back in place :)

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #62392
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    Here is an overview of the Direct Air Induction system on the F3 … it works very very well and gives the bike a great boost in power over the F2 bikes. It relies on the fact all of it needs to be in place and working properly, like the solenod valve at the back of the airbox, then you have seamless and strong power right through the rev range with zero flat spots and good throttle response at all revs.

    Taken from my write up in F3 forum :)

    The DAI (Direct Air Intake) was a two stage system that flows a direct shot of air to the carburetors’ internal chambers for an overall power increase and torque boost.

    Quite simply this is a system that really works and works very well too … anyone who stepped off an F2 as I did and went straight on to the later 98 F3 could feel the difference right away. Gone was the slight midrange feebleness of the F2, not quite a ‘hole’ but a sort of easing of urge between about 5,000 and 6,000 rpm. All F2’s had this. Replaced by smooth, much stronger power, especially noticeable if opening both bikes up in top gear around 5,000rpm had the F3 respond much more strongly and romp away from the older F2. The DAI system on the F3 together with bigger carburetors, shorter and straighter inlet tracts, and bigger jets with a remapped ignition system meant that the F3 simply felt more powerful all through the rev range, even from the moment you pulled off. A bonus of the Ram air system too, is that it produced a delightful growl from the carbs and airbox every time you opened up the throttle. The F3 also featured redesigned combustion chambers for higher compression and new pistons, rings and connecting rods for reduced friction and thereby giving an overall sharper response.

    The picture I have included above is quite a good one as it clearly shows the airflow through the DAI system’s various hoses and intakes.. later on I shall post a schematic from the top of my airbox that also shows routing and some actual close up pictures of my own system with all the hoses present and correct. So hopefully these can all be used for reference if re-instating the DAI system.

    I simply can’t stress enough how well this system works as a whole, and nor can I stress enough that if you mess with it, remove parts of it, have tubes blocked or disconnected, re-jet the carburetors or do anything to it other than maintain it as it’s meant to be then almost invariably you will end up with a worse performing bike. The reason for this is that the F3 carburetors are finely tuned to the air flow of the DAI system and the pressures that develop while the bike is on the move.

    Airflow from the DAI system is directed to various chambers in the carburetors including the float bowls. The system is designed to operate with the specific size of carburetors and the existing jets as fitted, the other thing to mention is that there is a solenoid at the back of the airbox which must be working too as this switches the airflow from 12mph onwards. So, you need to make sure your speedometer is working too as this ties the solenoid to the speed of the bike.

    There is a large air duct below the headlight and two small air ducts fitted either side of the fairing and just below the headlight. You need to make sure the little air ducts aren’t clogged up with a big bug or two. The system also balances atmospheric pressure within the carburetors when the bike is moving at different speeds. The solenoid is an air control valve and it’s energised when you switch on the ignition. Below around 12 mph, air is drawn in from the aforementioned intake ducts either side of the fairing and above 12 mph, air flows from the main air duct.

    So, it should be clear that all parts of this system need to be in place, connected and functioning for it to do it’s intended job … and as I said if everything is right and in good order the system really does give the F3 a welcome boost in power and torque.

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #62394
    Profile photo of fishfryer
    fishfryer
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 13,417

    @jules to the rescue.

    #62402
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    admin
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 127,277

    When I first saw this.. i figured the next few posts would be from @jules! haha

    Welcome to RideCBR.com @robdixon – Thanks for joining!

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