New Member, New Bike

RideCBR.com Forums New Member Introductions New Member, New Bike

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  • #65615
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Hi All,

    I’m a new member and just wanted to share a pic of my new bike – collected it Tuesday and had to ride it back from Northampton to Harrow – 53 miles including a very windy A509 and M1 but managed to get back in one piece.

    Wow – what a bike! Even with an aftermarket Scorpion sports exhaust can it went like a dream (with good earplugs!!). Very smooth and torquey. Getting the standard can from ebay which I hope to get powder-coated which will look nice too..

    Cheers,
    Tim

    P.S. Will be spending the weekend getting acquainted with my new toy; maybe if the weather picks up a bit I’ll even get it out of the garage. Though that seems unlikely on a typical Easter Bank Hol :(

    #65618
    Profile photo of dan5291
    dan5291
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Regular
    Points: 2,310

    I think you forgot to put the pic in the post :wink:

    I saw the picture you posted in your feed though. I dig the yellow on it:)

    Welcome to the forum, I’m pretty new here as well, but everyone comes across as helpful!

    What year is the bike?

    #65619
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Thanks Dan, yes I forgot to add the photo then didn’t know how to add a full size image afterwards!

    Mine is 1997 R reg. Only 12,800 miles from new and it’s genuine cos I now have every single MOT certificate, plus an HPI check… Having said that I found another one on Autotrader last night with even less: 8,800 on a ’98 plate!!

    Take it easy :)

    Tim

    #65620
    Profile photo of theredrocket
    theredrocket
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 33,444

    For a formal introduction I’d like to say, hello Tim :hi: Post a pic or two for us here to oogle over. Glad you found us and have fun with your new bike.

    #65621
    Profile photo of fishfryer
    fishfryer
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 13,417

    Congrats on the new bike. welcome. Post up pics of your area, us folks in the states only have 7/11s and walmarts for scenery.

    #65623
    Profile photo of kgprice
    kgprice
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Regular
    Points: 2,490

    Congrats hope you like it!!

    Kevin
    Pittsburgh, PA
    2001 Honda CBR 929RR Respol Edition

    #65634
    Profile photo of roqet
    roqet
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Addict
    Points: 8,449

    Welcome!

    #65640
    Profile photo of sdm1
    sdm1
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 20,857

    Welcome from Philippines. pix we want pix

    2014 CB1000R
    *2012 CBR250R
    *2005 CBR1000RR - SOLD

    #65644
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    #65652
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Hi @sdm1, @jules and others,

    here are the pics so far – took some with the side panels off also, to reveal good condition throughout – only light surface corrosion on the frame, etc.

    n

    #65653
    Profile photo of cbr-f2
    cbr-f2
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 25,415

    Nice!!! I like the look of that Scorpion can… Excellent score on your bike!!!
    :drunk:

    #65657
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    It looks in fabulous condition Tim :-)

    That rust is the same as I had on my rear subframe … I just rubbed down the rusty areas and used a rust converter like ‘rust remedy’ then used some silver smooth hammerite to touch it all back in, it looked as good as new.

    Also as I mentioned in the other thread, no point in creating work for yourself so just keep the exhaust, it looks great anyway and since the bike still performs well it must be a half decent one, the fact it has the small connector pipes says as much :-)

    I have some serious competition now, I thought it was me who had the fairest F3 in the land ..lol

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #65659
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Cheers Jules :)

    I’ll take your advice on the rust removal and protection. Coincidentally I just received a catalogue from Frost; expect you know them cos reading some of your previous posts you’re well versed in the art of car and bike restoration… Any opinion on their products? I did try restoring my Diversion’s fuel tank when it rusted right thru and started leaking petrol everywhere, using the Frost 3 stage process but for some reason it didn’t work properly so I ended up buying a replacement tank on Ebay and fitting that myself – been fine ever since…

    I truly doubt that you have any serious competition from me; your bike looks marvellous from the picture and knowing the TLC that you’ve undoubtedly lavished on it then she’s as pristine under the skin as on the surface.

    Anyway, as stated before somewhere, I buy used vehicles mainly on low mileage and condition but I’d only been looking for a few weeks before finding this one. My target was to find one between ’96 and ’98 with no more than 20k on the clock so this one practically jumped off the page at me (so to speak!)

    But if it’s any consolation, the day after I got mine home I was checking Ebay (to see if he’d taken the ad off mainly) I found a ’98 one with even LOWER mileage (8,800)!! Think it’s Superbike Factory or similar dealer; it may still be for sale but I’m not gonna look anymore it’ll only make me dissatisfied with what I’ve got.

    All I need to do now is start enjoying this one and get some biking miles and experience under my belt. I took my Direct Access course 9 years ago but have had only a few thousand miles on ‘proper’ (i.e over 125cc) bikes. Also want to do the IAM course so need to join my local group ( Middx Advanced Motorcyclists).

    Happy Easter x

    Tim

    #65792
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    Oh meh, 8,000 miles or 12,000 miles there’s nothing in it, not on an engine that can easily top 100,000 miles plus without even trying :-) These Honda CBR engines are almost unburstable and with decent oil changes and servicing will last longer than you ..lol I believe one or two are known to have done 300,000 miles and still going strong.

    The point is your bike is really low miles and good enough to make absolutely mint if you feel so inclined, so yes, just enjoy the ride… :)

    I have no direct experience with Frost but most of these places that sell restoration products are much of a muchness.

    I have had my F3 from new and when I bought her I stripped her down and flooded the internal box sections of the frame with lots of tins of waxoyl until it was oozoing out of every gap, the result is my frame is as good as new. It was my rear subframe that got tatty hidden under the seat but like yours that was surface rust on the outside and it cleaned up well before painting :-)

    The biggest and most important thing you can learn if you don’t know it already is ‘conscious’ counter steering.

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #65900
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Wow you are very meticulous – stripping down bike and filling frame with wax that’ll last forever – shame Honda don’t pay such attention to detail in their Quality Control as you! I know VW used to do that with Golfs cos my old MK2 used to have melted wax dripping from the doors on hot days.

    Thanks for the advice; our instructor explained counter steering to us on the Direct Access course and up until then I hadn’t realised that when you lean into a corner the bike is being steered by the bars turning away from the direction that the machine is turning.

    I’d been wanting to replace my Diversion for sometime due to the handling and brakes not exactly filling me with confidence! I had test rides on the CB500 and CB650 and immediately fell for the 650 with it’s smooth engine and handling etc. (the sound from the engine reminds me of a jet turbine almost). But I just didn’t feel like shelling out 7 grand for a bike which is why I started reading the used bike mags and everyone recommended the CBRs for a perfect combination of fun and everyday usability; looks like they were right :)

    Glad that the weather is picking up now so now’s the time for me to get out on the road and get some practice..

    Cheers,

    Tim

    #66029
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    Oh yes, Miss Fussy knickers here ..lol

    Yes, you always steer a bike, no matter what others tell you ..forget the ‘you just lean it a bit mate’ brigade ..lol

    And it’s only an initial shove in the wrong (opposite) direction to get the bike to lean and into the turn, once turning the bars do indeed then track with the bend. You can set up a pointer system to show the minute movements and prove that the bike is actually steering into the bend :-)

    Best bit is the NO BS bike, it leaves them all without doubt!! :-)

    http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/how-does-a-motorcycle-really-steer-round-corners/

    http://www.superbikeschool.com/machinery/no-bs-machine.php

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #66030
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Nice one, Jules :)

    Gyroscopic force vectors and precession – sounds like you’re straying into my realm now lol – planetary motion and Astronomy… I’m only an amateur in that field though cos my Maths skills are totally lacking!

    Seriously though, I was advised that counter steering could be used in an emergency e.g. if you’re going too fast into a bend then a quick bit of CS in the opposite direction can literally make the bike stand up out of the corner; is that correct? Sorry if I’m not expressing what I mean adequately, i.e. if one is going round a left-hander too fast then you can pull the left bar towards you to effectively force the machine to start turning to the right, thus pulling it upright again? (Obviously that would need extreme caution to avoid ending up on the wrong side of the road, potentially in the path of oncoming vehicles).

    I’ve practice conscious counter steering in small amounts already and it’s amazing the way it helps in twisty ‘S’ bends..

    #66068
    Profile photo of theredrocket
    theredrocket
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 33,444

    @saturnv yes your correct but to be technical, you want to “push” one the right grip not pull on the left. At speed you always use counter steering. At low speed you steer the bike by turning the tire in the direction you intend to go e.g. at a stop and turning right you point the front tire right to go right. Or a slow speed u-turn you balance and turn the front tire to do a right u-turn. At speeds to go left you will push the left handle away from you. And when I get really aggressive in my turns, I weigh my left peg and push down and away on my left grip. I know its not proper but I ride alot with one hand on my throttle only and will pull back on the bar to initiate my left turn. But a safety instructor will always tell you to KEEP BOTH HANDS ON YOUR BIKE AT ALL TIMES.

    #66074
    Profile photo of saturnv
    saturnv
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 23,125

    Thanks @theredrocket that’s useful :)

    So that technique WILL help to correct in an ‘overcooked’ corner?? I need to practice but it’s finding a safe time and place to do so – I guess a race circuit where everything travels the same direction would be the safest!!?

    Tim

    #66076
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    Hello Tim,

    I’m glad you get the whole counter steering concept and yes basically it’s a pull or push on the bars depending how you view it, but the result is it’s an opposite torque to the direction you want to go.

    So to turn left sharply at speed you push on the left bar or pull on the right bar, in practice I tend to use both bars evenly so I will push slightly on the left and pull slightly on the right, the main thing is my initial twisting force is opposite to the direction (left) the bike will go in. ie my twisiting force through the bars is initially to the right to kick the bike over left and then I ease off to let it follow the curve.

    Once that bike is leaning though and in the bend you do indeed relax this reverse torque through the bars and let the bike track naturally through the bend. I don’t recommend trying it but just as when you are upright you can take your hands off the bars and the bike keeps going straight, you can also lift off the bars and the bike stays tracking with the bend. That is what is meant by naturally tracking with the bend. It takes another amount of steering input to either make the bike go lower in the bend and tighten it or make it sit up and run wider.

    We all counter steer, but those who don’t ‘get’ it or haven’t been taught it are doing it subconsciously … that is all well and good until you need to steer the bike in an emergency.

    For instance, half way around a bend you see a large brick right in your path in the middle of the road. A lot of riders might get ‘target fixation’ and simply hit it without knowing exactly how to avoid it. It is by ‘conscioulsy’ counter steering, either by running tighter or wider that you avoid the brick. It is when you can ‘consciously’ counter steer that you are far more aware and ready to steer the bike at a moments notice.

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #66123
    Profile photo of theredrocket
    theredrocket
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 33,444

    @jules you are a rock star! You should teach bike safety. You have a very natural way of explaining how things work. I have been having withdrawals lately without your fabulous photo shoots btw :cry:

    #66132
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    @theredrocket Ooh, why thank you, kind Sir!! :-)

    I have honestly thought about getting into bike training and teaching bike safety but there’s only so many hours in the day…

    For my job I have always had to do a lot of technical writing and I have always loved the written word :-)

    Hmmm, pic withdrawals … that should change as the weather has really picked up here and spring has sprung, together with being able to get out on the bike again … in the meantime this was Chester this morning :-)

    http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/its-pissin-down/#post-66131

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #70265
    Profile photo of tommo
    tommo
    Registered Member
    Training Wheels
    Points: 140

    Hi all!! I’m very new to the forum! In fact so new, I feel like what I’d imagine my gran would feel if she was handed an iPhone!! I Used to know what I was doing! When did I get old??? Anyway, I have a cbr1000rr, which I picked up this year! I love her. Really I do! However, I have recently added to the family with an 1987 cbr600fh! I have discovered that she is a non runner and my motivation for getting her was to help learn how bikes work. Then I realised that she is the first model of the iconic cbr600F. The same model on which Steve Hyslop won the first ever super sport 600 class tt race on the Isle of man in 1989!! And so my adventure begins!! When I picked her up, I wheeled most of the bike into the shed, and carried the plastics, the rocker cover, the radiator and the horn in within a cardboard box! I have bought the Haynes and my first ever proper toolkit! So far I have acquired new gaskets, a new bolt and some sealer, and replaced the rocker cover. Then plugged the breather pipe and ht leads in, before rebuilding the radiator. long story short despite crossing fingers and toes, she is still a non runner! So hence my showing up here! I am at the start of turning a very old dream of mine into a reality, of taking a bike that is nearly deceased, and breathing life back into her. Once running, I want to take her back to original. This is going to take time and a lot of help!! And I hear that this is the place to get that help!! So hello all, and I look forward to hearing from you all!! Cheery!! Tommo.

    #70287
    Profile photo of jules
    jules
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 28,558

    @tommo Hey there :-) and welcome to the forum!!

    You would be best to make your own introduction thread, that way you will get a better response than just tagging it on to this old thread :-)

    I loved the CBR600F1 since they first came out and wrote a review about them here :-)

    http://ridecbr.com/forums/topic/the-bike-that-started-it-all-cbr600f-review/

    Good luck with the restoration and take pics and write up a build thread :-)

    Jules

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace...

    #70388
    Profile photo of admin
    admin
    Registered Member
    RideCBR Guru
    Points: 127,277

    Hey @tommo – Welcome to RideCBR. It does take a little bit to get used to but once you do, you’ll feel like other forums are years behind :-) Post @admin anywhere if you have any questions at all. Ride safe.

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