Member How To: Change Honda CBR600F3 Brake Pads

Forum Discussion Topic: Honda CBR600F3 Brake Pad Swap
How To Article Author: @jules

I am posting this here as it’s applicable to most CBRs … although I have to say the pad swap on an F3 is one of the easiest and quickest I have ever done. You can simply just change the pads, leaving the calipers in place and do nothing else but if you’re fussy like me you might want to check and clean your calipers up a bit too and lubricate the shims and sliding pins etc. which helps with braking efficency :-)

For this swap I used the genuine Honda OEM pads (Nissin) as I always found the brakes on my F3 to be just fine :-)

Old worn pads, compared with new ones…

You can still see there is life in the old pads as I’m not quite down to the max wear line but they are well past their best and aren’t pulling the bike up like they should, maybe some heat glazing or gradual contamination over the years…

Before you start it is best to push on the caliper body inwards against the disc so that the pistons retract into their bores, to not only facilitate removal of the pads but give clearance for the new thicker pads to go back in.

By unscrewing the bottom pad pin after first removing the pad pin plug, it pulls out and then the pads literally just fall out onto the floor.

Also if like me you have recently topped up or changed the brake fluid then you will need to remove the reservoir cap, place rags around it and siphon a little fluid out as it will overflow when you push the pistons back in…

The cap screws are removed ready to siphon out any excess fluid as I work on the brakes and push pistons back into their bores, keep the cap in place covering the reservoir between any fluid removal to keep dirt out…

Once the pads have dropped out you can simply place in the new ones, taking car they seat against the spring retainer clip correctly and that the pistons are far enough back to allow the thicker pads to slide in.

I actually removed the caliper to check their condition and remove the crud and clean them up a little. They were actually very good as the below picture shows, the piston plating is still intact on both pistons … often, especially on cars they are very heavily rusted on the outside…

With the caliper off the bike I cleaned it up and wiped off any crud from around the outside of the pistons and then cleaned the sliding caliper pins and shim and applied a small amount of grease to them to aid the caliper operation…

In this picture you can see the pad retaining clip at the top of the caliper that I have smeared with a bit of copper grease…

This picture shows the rear caliper removed and the location of the pad spring clip … again to remove the pads you can just remove the pad pin and the caliper bracket bolt and tilt the caliper upwards, then pull out the pads but I removed the caliper again for cleaning and checking over as well as lubing the contact surfaces and pad/caliper sliding pins…

Since I had removed the calipers to lubricate the pad pins and caliper sliding pins I then used a thread lock on the caliper mounting bolts as well as torquing them up to the correct torque values…

And that is it really, not much more to say … I found this swap ridiculously easy and is why I went further and cleaned and checked everything while I was at it…

When I took the bike down the road the bite and feel from the new pads was like night and day compared to the old ones :-)

It kinda shows you how we compensate for gradually deteriorating braking performance … I really thought my brakes were still good, but they weren’t and this pad change proved it for me….

And, now all back together … fluid checked and topped back up if necessary, disc (rotor) cleaned up and degreased … she now stops as well as she goes!! :-)

Jules

Thanks @jules for submitting another detailed Member How To article!
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